One of my favourite novels!

Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë‘s first and only published novel, written between October 1845 and June 1846,[1] and published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell; Brontë died the following year, aged 30. The decision to publish came after the success of her sister Charlotte’s novel, Jane Eyre. After Emily’s death, Charlotte edited the manuscript of Wuthering Heights, and arranged for the edited version to be published as a posthumous second edition in 1850.[2]

Wuthering Heights is the name of the farmhouse where the story unfolds. The book’s core theme is the destructive effect of jealousy and vengefulness both on the jealous or vengeful individuals and on their communities.

Dear learners,

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte is one of my favourite novels. This is what Wikipedia has to say about it:

Although Wuthering Heights is now widely regarded as a classic of English literature, it received mixed reviews when first published, and was considered controversial because its depiction of mental and physical cruelty was unusually stark, and it challenged strict Victorian ideals of the day, including religious hypocrisy, morality, social classes and gender inequality.[3][4] The English poet and painter Dante Gabriel Rossetti referred to it as “A fiend of a book – an incredible monster … The action is laid in hell, – only it seems places and people have English names there.”[5]

In the second half of the 19th century, Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre was considered the best of the Brontë sisters‘ works, but following later re-evaluation, critics began to argue Wuthering Heights was superior.[6] The book has inspired adaptations, including film, radio and television dramatisations, a musical by Bernard J. Taylor, a ballet, operas (by Bernard Herrmann, Carlisle Floyd, andFrédéric Chaslin), a role-playing game,[7] and a 1978 song by Kate Bush.

Advertisements

A bit hard to read, but well worth the effort.

ulysses (2)

Ulysses is a modernist novel by Irish writer James Joyce. It was first serialised in parts in the American journal The Little Reviewfrom March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach in February 1922, in Paris. It is considered to be one of the most important works of modernist literature,[1] and has been called “a demonstration and summation of the entire movement”.[2] According to Declan Kiberd, “Before Joyce, no writer of fiction had so foregrounded the process of thinking.”[3]However, even proponents of Ulysses such as Anthony Burgess have described the book as “inimitable, and also possibly mad”.[4]

Ulysses chronicles the peripatetic appointments and encounters of Leopold Bloom in Dublin in the course of an ordinary day, 16 June 1904.[5] Ulysses is the Latinised name of Odysseus, the hero of Homer‘s epic poem Odyssey, and the novel establishes a series of parallels between its characters and events and those of the poem (e.g., the correspondence of Leopold Bloom to Odysseus, Molly Bloom to Penelope, and Stephen Dedalus to Telemachus).

Ulysses is approximately 265,000 words in length, uses a lexicon of 30,030 words (including proper names, plurals and various verb tenses),[6] and is divided into eighteen episodes. Since publication, the book has attracted controversy and scrutiny, ranging from early obscenity trials to protracted textual “Joyce Wars.” Ulysses’ stream-of-consciousness technique, careful structuring, and experimental prose—full of puns, parodies, and allusions, as well as its rich characterisations and broad humour, made the book a highly regarded novel in the Modernist pantheon. In 1998, the Modern Library ranked Ulysses first on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.[7] Joyce fans worldwide now celebrate 16 June as Bloomsday.

To my learners.

Dear learners,

I have created this blog to interact with you. It is a place for us to discuss books, criticize writers, recommend writers and share our thoughts about our ongoing experiences in the English language arts classroom.

I hope that you enjoy it!

Kind regards,

Mr Mills.